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Cooper Thompson
Cooper Thompson

Narcos: Mexico - Season 2 !EXCLUSIVE!


Narcos: Mexico is an American-Mexican crime drama streaming television series created and produced by Chris Brancato, Carlo Bernard, and Doug Miro that premiered on Netflix on November 16, 2018. It was originally intended to be the fourth season of the Netflix series Narcos, but it was ultimately developed as a companion series. It focuses on the development of Mexico's illegal drug trade, whereas the parent series centered on the establishment of Colombia's illegal drug trade. The series' second season premiered on February 13, 2020.[1] On October 28, 2020, Netflix renewed the series for a third and final season but announced that actor Diego Luna would not be returning to reprise his role as Félix Gallardo.[2] The third and final season premiered on November 5, 2021.[3]




Narcos: Mexico - Season 2



Netflix renewed Narcos for two more seasons on September 6, 2016, a few days after the release of the second season.[7] Production on the fourth season began in Mexico in late 2017, following the release of the third season. On July 18, 2018, Netflix announced that the fourth season would instead "reset" with almost an entirely new cast as a new Netflix original series titled Narcos: Mexico.[4]


In December 2017, Michael Peña and Diego Luna were announced to star in the upcoming series.[10] A few days later, Matt Letscher joined the cast in a regular role.[11] Other key cast members revealed by showrunner Eric Newman include Tenoch Huerta, Joaquín Cosío, Teresa Ruiz, Alyssa Diaz, and José María Yazpik (reprising his role from the third season of Narcos).[12]


Amat Escalante and Alonso Ruizpalacios directed episodes for the upcoming series, while Colombian Andi Baiz, director of several episodes for the first three seasons of Narcos, also directed for Narcos: Mexico.[12] Actor Wagner Moura, who portrayed Pablo Escobar in the original Narcos also directed two episodes of season three. In October 2020, it was announced that Eric Newman had left as showrunner.[13]


In the third season, General Gutiérrez Rebollo, the Anti-Drug Czar, is arrested after Andrea Núñez finds the bank account receiving over $2 million USD and linking it to Rebollo. In reality, General Gutiérrez Rebollo received a call from the Secretary of Defense, General Enrique Cervantes, who ordered him to report to his office immediately on the night of February 6, 1997 where he was arrested.[19] Also in this season, the men of the Tijuana Cartel escaped from the Guadalajara airport in a TAESA plane, allegedly owned by Carlos Hank González, after the murder of Cardenal Juan Jesús Posadas Ocampo. However, Carlos Hank González was never the owner of this airline and there are multiple theories about the escape of the Tijuana Cartel that day, non which effectively link TAESA to the case.[20] Likewise, there are a series of accusations against Hank Gonzalez linking him to organized crime that have no basis in real life. Hank has never been prosecuted or sentenced for such links. The reason, according to José María Yazpik, is that "since Hank is already dead, his name can be used, while in other seasons, when faced with a possible lawsuit, they opted to change the names".[21]


The first season of Narcos: Mexico has a score of 90% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 39 reviews with an average rating of 7.4/10, with the critics consensus stating "Dangerous, thrilling, and highly addictive, Narcos: Mexico's first season expertly expands the franchise by exploring new territory in the drug war's grim history and showcasing electric performances from Diego Luna and Michael Peña."[22] On Metacritic, season one holds a weighted average score of 80 out of 100, based on 7 critics, indicating "generally favorable reviews".[23]


The second season holds a rating of 81% on Rotten Tomatoes based on 16 reviews with a weighted average score of 7.6/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "As addictive -- and relevant -- as ever, Narcos: Mexico's sophomore season is definitely more violent, but it never spoils the rich drama fans have come to love."[24]


All these things, in addition to other staples of the show such as an impressive ensemble cast and a glorious assortment of Latin American vistas, are present once again in the latest season - the second to focus on Mexican drug lord Miguel Ángel Félix Gallardo (played with aplomb by Diego Luna) and his Guadalajara cartel.


Season 2Episodes10Air dateFebruary 13, 2020PremiereSalva El TigreFinaleFree TradeSeason GuidePreviousNextSeason 1Season 3The second season of Narcos: Mexico was released on Netflix on February 13, 2020.


McNairy follows in the Narcos footsteps left behind by Boyd Holbrook, who played DEA agent Steve Murphy and who narrated the first two seasons, and Pedro Pascal, who played DEA agent Javier Peña and who narrated season three. (Peña was the starring DEA agent in season four, or Narcos: Mexico season one, with McNairy narrating.) Now, as the next DEA agent-in-charge in the burgeoning Mexican drug war in the late 1980s, Walt is a bit of a cowboy-idealist who lands in Mexico vowing to carry out a revenge-seeking mission in a different kind of way.


Netflix has announced the premiere date for the upcoming second season of crime drama series Narcos: Mexico which will feature new cast members including Sosie Bacon as Mimi Webb Miller and Scott McNairy as Walt Breslin. The series is scheduled to return on February 13, 2020, exclusively on Netflix. The date announcement also came with the release of first-look photos and a teaser for Season 2, which you can check out below!


Shifting away from Colombia, where Narcos spent three seasons, Narcos: Mexico explores the origins of the modern drug war by going back to its roots, beginning at a time when the Mexican trafficking world was a loose and disorganized confederation of independent growers and dealers. Witness the rise of the Guadalajara Cartel in the 1980s as Félix Gallardo (Diego Luna) takes the helm, unifying traffickers in order to build an empire. When DEA agent Kiki Camarena (Michael Peña) moves his wife and young son from California to Guadalajara to take on a new post, he quickly learns that his assignment will be more challenging than he ever could have imagined. As Kiki garners intelligence on Félix and becomes more entangled in his mission, a tragic chain of events unfold, affecting the drug trade and the war against it for years to come.


Joining the cast this season are Mayra Hermosillo as Enedina Arellano Felix, Sosie Bacon as Mimi Webb Miller, Andrés Londoño as Enrique Clavel, Alex Knight as Kenny Moss, Miguel Rodarte as Danilo Garza, Jesse Garcia as Sal Orozco, Matt Biedel as Daryl Petski, Jesus Ochoa as Juan Nepomuceno Guerra, Flavio Medina as Juan Garcia Abrego, Alberto Zeni as Amat Palacios, Jero Medina as Ossie Mejia, Jose Julian as Javier Arellano Felix, Noé Hernandez as Rafael Aguilar, and Nat Faxon as Ted Kaye.


Narcos: Mexico fans got to know the character of Mimi Webb (played by Sosie Bacon) when she was introduced in the second season of the popular Netflix drama. In a relationship with drug trafficker Pablo Acosta (Gerardo Taracena), she played a key role in the events of the series. She was based on a real woman - here's what you need to know about where she is now.


Fans were perhaps not so surprised to see Quavo star in the season 2 of Narcos: Mexico, which premiered yesterday (February 13) on Netflix. In episode two, Quavo gives a group of Mexican dealers a lesson in how to cook up crack.


The series premiered November 16 with Eric Newman serving as executive producer and showrunner. The series is a companion to its predecessor Narcos which ran for three seasons. Narcos: Mexico explores the origins of the modern drug war by going back to its roots, beginning at a time when the Mexican trafficking world was a loose and disorganized confederation of independent growers and dealers. Witness the rise of the Guadalajara Cartel in the 1980s as Félix Gallardo (Diego Luna) takes the helm, unifying traffickers in order to build an empire. When DEA agent Kiki Camarena (Michael Peña) moves his wife and young son from California to Guadalajara to take on a new post, he quickly learns that his assignment will be more challenging than he ever could have imagined. As Kiki garners intelligence on Félix and becomes more entangled in his mission, a tragic chain of events unfold, affecting the drug trade and the war against it for years to come.


Narcos: Mexico returns for its second season February 13 on a Roman emperor trip. Miguel Félix Gallardo (Diego Luna), the godfather of the Mexican drug trade, has conquered his rivals in Colombia and "united the barbarians" of small, local crews into the Guadalajara cartel, which makes him Julius Caesar. But we all remember what happened to Julius Caesar. This story has no happy ending. Probably not even for El Padrino's pet tiger. (Especially not even for El Padrino's pet tiger?)


Diego Luna was among the brightest spots of Narcos: Mexico in season 1, and while Felix's trajectory in season 2 isn't as rags-to-riches spectacular, he still makes a compelling enough protagonist. Every time he staves off an imminent rout, the difference between winning and losing is slender enough to get your adrenaline pumping. By contrast, the others tend to fall short: summoning up enough interest in what all the bit players are up to, be it Acosta or DEA agent Walt Breslin (Scoot McNairy) or Isabella (Teresa Ruiz), can be somewhat difficult. There's a mild sense of rinse-lather-repeat, like we've seen it all before.


Part of that twist comes courtesy Amado Carrillo Fuentes (Jose Maria Yazpik), Felix's fleet 'commander' in a sense. Amado's character has always been somewhat in the background; he's the suave, laidback guy who's been flying drugs in and out of Mexico for several Narcos seasons now. But a look at Fuentes' real life rap sheet shows he was among the most powerful drug lords in Mexico, with his business running into hitherto unprecedented volumes. The ending of this season indicates that Narcos' next edition may well track Amado Carrillo Fuentes' story, and not El Chapo's. 041b061a72


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